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NASA

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NASA Announces Partnership Opportunities for U.S. Commercial Lunar Lander Capabilities

Astrobotic's Griffin Lunar lander.  Credits: Astrobotic

[NASA Press Release - 17.01.2014]
Building on the progress of NASA's partnerships with the U.S. commercial space industry to develop new spacecraft and rockets capable of delivering cargo, and soon, astronauts to low Earth orbit, the agency is now looking for opportunities to spur commercial cargo transportation capabilities to the surface of the moon.

NASA Spacecraft Begins Collecting Lunar Atmosphere Data

LADEE approaches lunar orbit. Credits: NASA

[NASA Press Release - 21.11.2013]
NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is ready to begin collecting science data about the moon.

Moon mission beams laser data to ESA station

LADEE transmitting laser signal. Credits: NASA

[ESA Press Release - 01.11.2013]
ESA’s ground station on the island of Tenerife has received laser signals over a distance of 400 000 km from NASA’s latest Moon orbiter. The data were delivered many times faster than possible with traditional radio waves, marking a significant breakthrough in space communications.

NASA Laser Communication System Sets Record with Data Transmissions to and from Moon

LADEE LLCD Operations. Credits: NASA

[NASA Press Release - 22.10.2013]
NASA's Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) has made history using a pulsed laser beam to transmit data over the 239,000 miles between the moon and Earth at a record-breaking download rate of 622 megabits per second (Mbps).

NASA-Funded Scientists Detect Water on Moon's Surface that Hints at Water Below

Chandrayaan-1 image of water on the Moon surface. Credits: ISRO/NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Brown Univ

NASA-funded lunar research has yielded evidence of water locked in mineral grains on the surface of the moon from an unknown source deep beneath the surface.

NASA Prepares for First Virginia Coast Launch to Moon

LADEE approaches lunar orbit. Credits: NASA

[NASA Press Release - 22.08.2013]
In an attempt to answer prevailing questions about our moon, NASA is making final preparations to launch a probe at 11:27 p.m. EDT Friday, Sept. 6, from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Va.

Laser communications set for Moon mission

LADEE approaches lunar orbit. Credits: NASA

[ESA Press Release - 30.07.2013]
An advanced laser system offering vastly faster data speeds is now ready for linking with spacecraft beyond our planet following a series of crucial ground tests. Later this year, ESA’s observatory in Spain will use the laser to communicate with a NASA Moon orbiter.

NASA's Grail Mission Solves Mystery of Moon's Surface Gravity

Variations in the lunar gravity field as measured by GRAIL. Credits: NASA

[NASA Press Release - 30.05.2013]
NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission has uncovered the origin of massive invisible regions that make the moon's gravity uneven, a phenomenon that affects the operations of lunar-orbiting spacecraft.

Because of GRAIL's findings, spacecraft on missions to other celestial bodies can navigate with greater precision in the future.

Teams Prepare For NASA $1.5 Million Robot Challenge

Artist impression of a regolith exavator. Credits: NASA

[NASA Press Release - 29.05.2013]
Eleven teams from across the country and around the globe are preparing to compete for $1.5 million during NASA's 2013 Sample Return Robot Challenge, June 5-7 at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Worcester, Mass.

Bright Explosion on the Moon

Lunar meteoroid impact sites. Credits: NASA.

[NASA Press Release - 17.05.2013]
For the past 8 years, NASA astronomers have been monitoring the Moon for signs of explosions caused by meteoroids hitting the lunar surface. "Lunar meteor showers" have turned out to be more common than anyone expected, with hundreds of detectable impacts occurring every year.

They've just seen the biggest explosion in the history of the program.

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